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Giles Terera

Giles Terera withdraws from ‘Death of England’ play following surgery

Olivier Award winning actor Giles Terera has withdrawn from the National Theatre’s upcoming production of Death of England: Delroy following emergency surgery.

The National Theatre stressed the Terera’s medical issue was not covid related, but that he would need six-weeks to recuperate.

centre Giles Terera (Aaron Burr) with West End Cast of Hamilton - Photo credit Matthew Murphy
centre Giles Terera (Aaron Burr) with West End Cast of Hamilton – Photo credit Matthew Murphy

An actor, musician and film maker, Terera is best known for originating the role of Aaron Burr in the West End production of Hamilton. His many theatre credits include performances at the National Theatre and in the West End in such classics, as Hamlet, The Tempest, The Merchant of Venice, Troilus and Cressida, as well as more modern dramas Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and musicals Avenue Q, The Rat Pack and The Book of Mormon. He most recently appeared in the West End revival of Rosmersholm alongside Hayley Atwell and Tom Burke.

Giles Terera & Michael Jibson (c) Pamela Raith
Giles Terera & Michael Jibson (c) Pamela Raith

The role in the one-man show will now be played by Michael Balogun, who has been understudying the part.

Written by Clint Dyer and Roy Williams, Death of England: Delroy explores a Black working-class man “searching for truth and confronting his relationship with Great Britain”. The play is a standalone piece but is written in direct response to their previous play Death of England.

The play is the first show to be performed at the National Theatre since theatres across the UK closed on 16 March.

Death of England: Delroy begins performances on 21 October 2020 and runs until 28 November 2020.

Giles Terera in rehearsal for The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui at the Donmar Warehouse.
Giles Terera in rehearsal for The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui at the Donmar Warehouse. Photo: Jack Sain

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