The Pajama Game at the Shaftesbury Theatre

Shaftesbury Theatre, 210 Shaftesbury Avenue, London, WC2H 8DP

Richard Eyre brings his hugely successful Chichester production of The Pajama Game into London’s Shaftesbury Theatre starring Joanna Riding and Michael Xavier.

Following a crowd-pleasing run at the Chichester Festival Theatre, this sparkling production of the much-loved Broadway hit The Pajama Game is now playing at the Shaftesbury Theatre for a limited run.

Richard Eyre’s blissful production stars two-time Olivier Award winning actress Joanna Riding as the feisty heroine and Michael Xavier as her love interest. The show also stars Gary Wilmot as Vernon Hines and Colin Stinton as Hasler.

A fabulous score includes hit songs Hey There (You With The Stars In Your Eyes), Hernando’s Hideaway and Steam Heat.

The Pajama Game features words and music by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, and a book by George Abbott and Richard Bissell. This production is directed by Richard Eyre, with choreography by Stephen Mear and design by Tim Hatley.

THE STORY

In 1950s America, love is in the air at the Sleep-Tite Pajama Factory as handsome new Superintendent Sid Sorokin (Michael Xavier) falls head-over-heels for firebrand Union rep Babe Williams (Joanna Riding). Sparks fly when the employees are refused a seven-and-a-half cents raise, leaving Sid and Babe deliciously at odds as the temperature rises… Will love, eventually, conquer all?

THE CAST

Joanna Riding (Babe Williams), Michael Xavier (Sid Sorokin),  Gary Wilmot (Vernon Hines), Alexis Owen Hobbs (Gladys), Claire Machin (Mabel), Colin Stinton (Hasler / Pop), Eugene McCoy (Prez), Siôn Lloyd (Max), Jennie Dale (Mae), Sharon Wattis (Poopsie), Keisha Amponsa Banson (Brenda), Lauren Varnham (Charlene), Jo Morris (Rita), Nolan Frederick (Charley), Richard Jones (Frank), Dan Burton (Earl) and James O’Connell (Joe).

REVIEWS

★★★★★ “Pure pleasure… Richard Eyre does it again” (Telegraph)
★★★★★ “Richard Eyre’s joyous production of this 1954 show has an exuberance comparable to that of his National Theatre Guys and Dolls” (The Guardian)