All That Fall at the Arts Theatre

Arts Theatre, 6-7 Great Newport Street, London, WC2H 7JB

All That Fall by Samuel Beckett at the Arts Theatre

Max Stafford-Clark’s “ingenious, evocative” production of Samuel Beckett’s remarkable radio play All That Fall will transfer to the West End following sell-out performances at Wilton’s Music Hall and Bristol Old Vic.

Don’t miss this opportunity to “see” Tony Award-winner Bríd Brennan’s much-praised performance as one of Beckett’s most memorable characters: the funny, crotchety and self-pitying Maddy Rooney. Joining the terrific cast will be Adrian Dunbar, taking on the role of Maddy’s blind, enigmatic husband.

Theatre company Out of Joint will be ripping up some seats in the Arts Theatre to stage its groundbreaking production in which the audience wear blindfolds, and actors roam about the auditorium, enhanced by an extraordinary 360º sound design.

By turns funny, chilling and moving, All That Fall is one of Beckett’s most naturalistic and accessible plays, inspired by boyhood memories of his native Ireland. It is a play about faltering journeys: an old woman sets out to greet her husband at the station on his birthday, only for events to take an epic and deeply unsettling turn…

All That Fall runs from 13 April 2016 until 14 May 2016 at The Arts Theatre

STORY

A play about faltering journeys: an elderly woman’s slow walk to a country station to meet her husband on his birthday, and the people who help and hinder her; her blind husband’s train ride home – and the strange event that delays it, keeping them apart in more ways than one.

CAST

Tony Award-winner Bríd Brennan will play the unforgettable Maddy Rooney alongside Adrian Dunbar as her husband.

REVIEWS

★★★★ “An experience to be cherished” The Times
★★★★ “An ingenious, evocative production” Financial Times
★★★★ “The wonderful Bríd Brennan” Evening Standard
★★★★ “Beckett’s best play… In Stafford-Clark’s production, with its diverse aural decor and voices looming at us out of the dark, it comes to vivid life” The Guardian